12 Landscape, seaside and coast prints on display

Original prints

Listed below are all my current original prints of landscapes, seascapes and coast – they are limited edition linocuts printed personally by me, a lino print artist. I use ink rollers, paint brushes and a hand-cranked printing press - no on/off switches, no electrical plugs are involved - except the one on the kettle!

What is an original print and what is a limited edition?

You can buy my lino prints from my galleries in Yorkshire, UK. I am planning to add the ability to buy from this site using PayPal. If you would like to know when this is achieved, subscribe to my newsletter.

More original linocut prints on show

What is an original print?

An original print begins when a printmaking artist gets an idea for a print and draws a quick sketch. If the printmaker likes their rough sketch, they will start making the print. They do not make a highly finished painting or drawing inbetween the rough sketch and the print. That's the important thing to remember: an original print is never a copy of a painting or drawing on canvas, paper or a computer.

Sometimes, you might want to be sure you're buying an original print. So I explain the three kinds of art prints you're most likely to encounter and some simple questions to ask in order to be sure.

What is a limited edition?

A limited edition print has a number which tells you how many were printed. The number will be something like this 1/25, 2/25 or 3/25, and so on. This example means there were 25 prints printed. It means there won't ever be more than 25 – ever. It's an edition of prints limited to 25. As time passes, there may be less prints as they are damaged or lost. So if the print you buy has the number 16/18, it means you are the proud owner of the 16th print in a limited edition of only 18 prints in total.

Original prints are naturally limited by the wear and tear on the printmaking materials used to make them. For example: lino begins to spread after so many passes through a printing press so no longer registers properly; lino also becomes brittle and breaks. It's simply not possible to make hundreds or thousands of prints from a lino block. This is why a number like this: 230/500 will not be an original print. Even etching editions, which are made using metal plates, rarely manage to be above 200.

You can read more about how I make my lino prints here.